Aotearoa (New Zealand) and SInging to connect head and heart

In the air over Aotearoa (New Zealand) between the north and south Island.
Aotearoa
(literally, ao = cloud, tea = white, pale, roa = long). This could be translated as (the) long white cloud. It does not mean “Land of the Long White Cloud“. In Maori that would be Te Whenua o Aotearoa.

As with many Maori place names, the context from which the name derives is important. Traditional accounts suggest that Hine-te-aparangi, wife of well known pacific navigator/explorer Kupe, after a long ocean going voyage, sighted a particular cloud aotea that usually indicates the presence of land. The term roa can also indicate a length of time. Thus, a more accurate translation could be ‘It has been a long time since seeing a cloud that indicates land’.
Aotearoa is commonly given as the Maori name for New Zealand. Before the arrival of Europeans to the New Zealand, it probably only referred to the Te Ika a Maui (i.e., the North Island).
Today out the plane window Massive Clouds tower high just on the edge of where the north island starts. Huge masses of white and grey with long points trailing so far from the tower that they cast deep shadows on the lower section of the could mass. All around the huge cloud masses are fluffy little patches of cloud thin at first then joining to form an almost continuous blanket of white.

Maori language sounds like a song. An example right here is the word Aotearoa (Are tay a row a) it is beautiful not only in sound but in the description it gives (long white cloud). Others have said that some of the Maori names for waterfalls are a mini poem as they describe the waterfall and all around it. Not only is the talking song like when spoken but much of the communication traditionally is via song.

Some Maori words and their meanings.
• Aroha – compassion, tenderness, sustaining love
• Ihi – power, authority, essential force
• Mana – authority, power; influence, reputation
• Mauri – hidden essential life force or a symbol of this
For more language / words see http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/culture/maori-language-week/365-maori-words

Singing is one thing that turns on the Head and the Heart nerve lines simultaneously and brings one to a high state of feeling. Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha (Cherokee Elder and International Peace Keeper) share the wisdom of this and demonstrates it with the songs she sings – powerful prayers.

So where ever you are today have a sing. If you’re already feeling great sing anyway you can lift those around you. If you’re feeling bad then sing – the worse you are feeling the more reason to put on your favorite song and get to a level where you can hum along then sing, sing, sing. Encourage children to sing and keep singing – especially when they create their own songs.

A friend of mine in the US has wonderful songs – her name is Deb Adler but her other name Song Bird is more telling – see for yourself http://www.myspace.com/debadlersongbyrd

Elway diyi Ugli’ta

About Geraldene

I'm passionate about People and their Connection to the Natural World. To supporting projects and ideas that result in Earth Care and harmony. I'm very interested in Indigenous Wisdoms. I'm a mum of two lovely kids, daughter and friend. I love travelling and meeting people. I am keen on being responsible and creating the world around me.
This entry was posted in Environment, Grandmother Parisha, Mia Dalby-Ball, Pa'Ris'Ha, Venerable Pa'Ris'Ha and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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